EXHIBITION: Mana BSMT Presents: N. M. Brandreth’s Phantasmagoria’s Seeing Shadows

Apr. 26–Jun. 7, 2019
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Have you ever glimpsed a movement out of the corner of your eye and turned to find nothing there? Have you ever bolted up the basement steps convinced that something was down there with you? Seeing Shadows attempts to visualize these sensations as photographic objects. Derived from Brandreth’s love for horror and the macabre, and from the histories of photography and film, these unique handmade works are at once seductive and utterly uncanny.

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PANEL AND EXHIBITION: Watercolor Rediscovered: Whistler in the Nineteenth Century

Watercolor Rediscovered: Whistler in the Nineteenth Century
Exhibition: May 18, 2019–October 6, 2019
Freer Gallery of Art, galleries 10 and 11

James McNeill Whistler reinvented himself as an artist in the 1880s and painted his way into posterity with the help of watercolor. Beginning in 1881, he created a profusion of small, marketable works over the next fifteen years. “I have done delightful things,” he confided, “and have a wonderful game to play.” For Whistler, the word “game” referred to the watercolors themselves and to his plans for selling them.

Museum founder Charles Lang Freer amassed the world’s largest collection of Whistler’s watercolors, with more than fifty seascapes, nocturnes, interior views, and street scenes. His vast collection also included prints, drawings, pastels, and oil paintings by the artist. Due to Freer’s will, these works have never left the museum, and the fragile watercolors have rarely been displayed. Recent research conducted by museum curators, scientists, and conservators now shines new light on Whistler’s materials, techniques, and artistic genius, as seen in this first major exhibition of his watercolors at the Freer Gallery since the 1930s.

In conjunction with the opening of Whistler in Watercolor, explore the development of watercolor in the Victorian era and James McNeill Whistler’s contributions to the genre at an event on Sunday, May 19, 2019, 2pm.
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SYMPOSIUM: Collecting the “Uncollectible”: Earth and Site-Specific Sculpture

Presented by the Center for the History of Collecting, Frick Art Reference Library, The Frick Collection, NY
Thursday, May 23, 2019, 2 – 7 p.m.

More information: https://www.frick.org/research/center/symposia
Program PDF

This half-day symposium focuses on collecting site-specific, large-scale, and light-based works by artists including, among others, Walter de Maria, Nancy Holt, Robert Smithson, Michelle Stuart, and James Turrell. A panel of scholars, curators, collectors, an artist, and a conservator explores related challenges of installation, maintenance, preservation, and ultimate stewardship. Virginia Dwan, Suzaan Boettger, Jarl Mohn, Jessica Morgan, Leonard Riggio, and Michelle Stuart are among the participants. Sponsorship from the Robert H. Smith Family Foundation and Northern Trust has made this event possible.

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CFP: “Weather the Weather,” a group exhibition by SciArt Center

A group exhibition by SciArt Center at the New York Hall of Science
September 10th, 2019 – January 10th, 2020

Deadline to submit: June 3rd, 11:59pm EST
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The weather is ever-present, often dramatic, and always uncontrollable. SciArt welcomes submissions surrounding the topics of studying, understanding, and experiencing the weather.​

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EXHIBITION: ​​New Age, New Age: Strategies for Survival

April 25 – August 11, 2019
DePaul Art Museum
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​​New Age, New Age: Strategies for Survival is an exhibition of work from the last fifteen years by contemporary artists who appropriate, critique, or embrace “New Age” aesthetics and concerns from a 21st century perspective. Emerging in the 1960s and 1970s against a backdrop of war, social strife and a crisis of modernity, the multifaceted New Age “movement” was characterized by alternative approaches to traditional Western culture, with an interest in spirituality, mysticism, holism, and environmentalism. It embodied a complicated conflation of politics, religion, science, social communities, art, music, and self-realization. Often dismissed for its association with drugged out hippies or flower-power children, how can New Age philosophies and practices be reconsidered today as relevant movement for social change and wellness?

Artists include:
Maikoiyo Alley-Barnes, Lise Haller Baggesen, Alun Be, Elijah Burgher, D. Denenge Duyst-Akpem, Whit Forrester, Desirée Holman, Cathy Hsiao, Michiko Itatani, Rashid Johnson, Marva Lee Pitchford-Jolly, Jenny Kendler, Liz Magic Laser, Matt Morris, Shana Moulton, Heidi Norton, Tony Oursler, Mai-Thu Perret, Robert Pruitt, Bob Ross, Luis A. Sahagun, Mindy Rose Schwartz, Suzanne Treister, Rhonda Wheatley, Megan Whitmarsh and Jade Gordon, Saya Woolfalk​

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RIP: Quentin Fiore (1920-2019)

Quentin Fiore, the graphic designer whose work helped magnify and popularize Marshall McLuhan’s maxim that “the medium is the message,” died on April 13 at a care facility in North Canaan, Conn. He was 99.

While he was best known for his book collaborations in the 1960s with McLuhan, the communications theorist, he also did notable work with the antiwar activist Jerry Rubin and the inventor and visionary Buckminster Fuller.

His obituary is available here

Article on Fiore and McLuhan collaboration is here

EXHIBITION: The Codex and Crafts in Late Antiquity (February 23–July 8, 2018)

Bard Graduate Center, February 23 – July 8, 2018

The transition from roll to codex as the standard format for the book is one of the most culturally significant innovations of late antiquity, the period between the third and eighth centuries AD.

This exhibition offers a concise history of the first steps of the codex book format from a technical and technological point of view. Specifically it focuses on the different techniques used to turn leaves of papyrus or parchment into a functional book that could be safely used and preserved.

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EXHIBITION: Anti-Confucian Propaganda in Mao’s China

Anti-Confucian Propaganda in Mao’s China is a compelling exhibition installed in Geisel West, 2nd Floor near Special Collections & Archives on the University of California, San Diego campus. Collected by Matthew Wills, a doctoral candidate in the Department of History, the materials in the exhibition reflect a 1970s campaign to reinforce the power of political elites and affirm the absolute correctness of Maoist socialism. Some of these materials are no longer available in China.

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SYMPOSIUM: Changing By Degrees: Multidisciplinary Approaches to Climate Change

A symposium organized by Johns Hopkins University Advanced Academic Programs, Friday, May 3, 2019, 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Rather than an academic conference with speakers presenting formal papers, this symposium will provide a framework for understanding climate issues and engaging in a conversation with a range of climate leaders, including:

  • Dr. Kirk Johnson, director of the National Museum of Natural History (morning keynote)
  • Martin O’Malley, former governor of Maryland (closing keynote)
    Angela Fritz, meteorologist, and deputy editor at the Washington Post (panel facilitator and discussion leader)
  • Martin Dahinden, Swiss ambassador to the United States
    Kate Brown, executive director, Global Island Partnership
  • Dr. John Cook, Center for Climate Change Communication, George Mason University
  • Dr. Brenda Ekwurzel, senior climate scientist and director of climate science, Union of Concerned Scientists
  • Thomas Peterson, director of the Center for Climate Strategies, Johns Hopkins University

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Facebook Society: Losing Ourselves in Sharing Ourselves: Reviewed by Amy Ione

According to Roberto Simanowski, the author of Facebook Society: Losing Ourselves in Sharing Ourselves, this volume isn’t a book about Facebook. Rather his concern is what he calls Facebook society. His starting point is Facebook’s claim that it is building a “global community,” and his underlying assumption is that social-media platforms have altered social interaction, political life, and outlooks on the world, even for people who do not regularly use them. Bringing boundless enthusiasm to how Facebook and other social apps create community, this cultural studies perspective both celebrates networked society and offers a critique of problematic elements derived from digital communities, with a particular focus on our concept of the self.

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